WOOD SPECIES INFORMATION

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Western Red Cedar

Thuja plicata

Western Red Cedar is typically reddish to pinkish brown, often with random streaks and bands of darker red/brown areas. This wood has a straight grain and a medium to course texture.  Western Red Cedar has been rated as durable to very durable in regard to decay resistance, though it is not resistant to insect attack.
Material
Western Red Cedar

NFPA Class*

B

*NFPA is the National Fire Protection

**UBC is the Uniform Building Code

Buoyancy and Weight

Cedar Janka – 350

Average Weight – 23 lbs./cu. ft.

*The Janka rating is a measure of the amount of force required to push a .444″ diameter steel ball half way into a piece of wood.

Workability

Easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though it dents and scratches very easily due to its softness. Glues and finishes well, though as is the case with most softwoods with closed pores, even staining can be a challenge.

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Massaranduba (Massa)

Manilkara bidentata

Massaranduba is a cost-effective, yet highly comparable alternative to slightly denser and more costly selections such as Ipe and Cumaru. Deep red hues accompany this delightful tropical hardwood, and the effective life of this species is over a couple of decades. Massa has straighter grains than most of the tropical hardwoods.

Fire Resisatance

Material

NFPA Class*

UBC Class**

Flame spread at 10 min.

Massa

A

1

0

*NFPA is the National Fire Protection

**UBC is the Uniform Building Code

Density and Buoyancy

Massaranduba Janka* rating – 3190

The Average weight is 66 lbs./cu.ft.  Specific Gravity .85

*The Janka rating is a measure of the amount of force required to push a .444″ diameter steel ball half way into a piece of wood.

Workability

Moderately easy to work with, finishes to a very smooth surface.

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Ipê

TABEBUIA SPP

Ipê, often called Brazilian walnut, is a beautiful exotic wood from South America. Typically used for decking and other outdoor applications, ipê structures are hard, strong, and naturally resistant to rot, abrasion and weather. It is almost twice as dense as most woods and up to five times harder. It is dark brown in color.

Fire Resistance

Material

Flame Spread Index (10 min)

Flame Spread Index (30 min)

Smoke Developed Value (10 min)

NFPA Class*

UBC Class**

Ipe

0

5

3

A

1

*NFPA is the National Fire Protection

**UBC is the Uniform Building Code

Density and Buoyancy

Ipê Janka* rating – 3680

Average weight is 72 lbs./cu. ft. Specific gravity is .92 so it barely floats.

*The Janka rating is a measure of the amount of force required to push a .444″ diameter steel ball half way into a piece of wood.

Drying and Shrinkage

It dries extremely well with little checking, twisting, or bow.

Workability

Ipê can be difficult to work with, especially with hand tools. It can have a blunting effect on cutting edges, so pre‐drilling for nails and screws is recommended. It comes in good long lengths with limited warp. Planks do not bend well, but the wood finishes and sands quite smoothly, with no splintering.

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Garapa

Apuleia leiopcarpa

This is a Brazilian hardwood.  This wood is a beautiful light golden yellow with a medium luster and a fine grain.  It is durable and resistant to rot and decay. Garapa is also resistant to insects and fungi.  Garapa is a very strong wood and is scratch resistant.

Fire Resistance

Material

NFPA Class*

UBC Class**

Garapa

A

1

*NFPA is the National Fire Protection

**UBC is the Uniform Building Code

Density and Buoyancy

Garapa Janka* rating – 1700

The Average weight is 50 lbs./cu. Ft. Specific Gravity is  .86

*The Janka rating is a measure of the amount of force required to push a .444″ diameter steel ball half way into a piece of wood.

Workability

Garapa glues well and is very stable once glued.  It cuts, nails, and screws well without a tremendous blunting effect on tools.

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Cypress

Taxodium distichum

Cypress is a light colored wood with an even grain.  It is rot, fungi, and insect resistant.  Baldcypress grows in swampy areas along the Atlantic coast from Delaware to southern Florida, west along the Gulf Coast to southeastern Texas and along the Mississippi river valley to southeastern Illinois. About one-half of the cypress lumber comes from the Southern States and one-fourth from the South Atlantic States.

Fire Resistance

Material

NFPA Class*

Cypress

C

*NFPA is the National Fire Protection

**UBC is the Uniform Building Code

Buoyancy and Weight

Cypress Janka – 570

Average Weight – 32 lbs/cu.ft.  Specific Gravity .42

*The Janka rating is a measure of the amount of force required to push a .444″ diameter steel ball half way into a piece of wood.

Workability

Cypress works well with both hand and power tools. The wood planes easily and resists warping. Although cypress is resinous, it glues well, sands easily and readily accepts finishes.

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